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Learning to crochet

I’ve been threatening to do this for at least three years, but I never got around to it until now.  I guess the acquisition of Granny’s squares just pushed me over the proverbial edge.

I’ve got this book on the way, I watched a few YouTube videos today, and then this evening I started Linda’s  online crochet class.

So far in the class, I’ve watched the introduction and the overview of the various stitches.  I’m confident I can do this!

So I grabbed some of Granny’s yarn and her hook, and got started. (Maybe I should have grabbed some sunglasses while I was at it – that is some vibrant yarn!)

I made my first chain, no problem.  Hey, this is easy.

Then I attempted my first row of single crochet, and got lost after the first three (probably bungled) stitches.

All is not lost, though, because I think I’ve taught myself a little something that wasn’t included in the class…

You can’t fry hamburgers and learn how to crochet at the same time.  Duh!

Supper is over now, the hamburger was delicious (on a potato roll with a bit of bbq sauce, a squirt of mustard and a crunchy onion ring – yum!) so it’s back to the hook for a second try.  I’ll let you know how I do!

15 thoughts on “Learning to crochet

  1. I learned to crochet when I was 7 or 8. If a kid that young can learn, anyone can. 🙂

    Like any other craft, it takes some patience and practice until you get the motions down, but once you do, it’s easy.

  2. Oh, and also: pay particular attention to the lessons on what to do at the beginning and end of rows, especially when you get into double and triple crochet stitches. The first projects I made back when I was a kid had hideously wavy edges until I learned the proper way to start and end a row. That and crocheting that first row into a chain are the most difficult things to learn about crochet.

    1. She mentioned that on the video (the wavy edge thing). And crocheting into that first row is what I have been having difficulty with. After I posted this, I decided to focus on other things, since I’m more interested in granny squares and decorative motifs at the moment – I can always go back and figure out how to make a proper swatch later. I did manage to crochet a couple of (kinda wonky) granny squares and a three-color flower, none of which was all that hard, so I am encouraged!

  3. you can do this!

    i taught myself how to crochet about two years ago. i second Tinas advice about paying close attention to the ends, the middle is easy, the ends are a different story. but yeah, you’ll get this. if i can do it, so can you. ahng in there. 🙂

    1. Thanks for the encouragement! So far I’m mostly interested in the decorative parts of crochet, so I can put off the harder stuff for now 🙂

  4. You should get the book, Stitch n Bitch: The Happy Hooker. I hadn’t crocheted in years, and it had very thorough instructions and diagrams for learning (or re-learning in my case) how to crochet.

    1. Thanks for the recommendation. I tend to be more of a visual learner when it comes to any kind of stitching – no matter how good the diagrams and descriptions are, I can’t get a very good handle on it without a video.

  5. Crocheting is on my list of skills to learn as well. Bought a book last year but so far haven’t even had time to open it! You’ve inspired me (again. School holidays are coming up at the end of next week and this seems like a good way to spend the cold winter holidays. My daughter, 8, might like to give it a go too, she learnt to knit last year.

    1. Sounds like fun! I keep thinking my son would like it, too – he likes to flip through the amigurumi books when we are in the craft section at the book store…

  6. I totally agree with Tina and Tammie. The beginnings and ends of rows can be a little tricky at first, but it does get much easier. After helpful relatives gave me a couple of demonstrations that left me mostly befuddled and frustrated, I taught myself to crochet about 2-3 years ago. Now it’s one of my favorite pastimes. I can’t get enough crochet! (One of these days, I’d like to try to learn to knit, too.)

    You can definitely do this! 🙂

    1. First impressions are leaving me thinking that crochet is more instant-gratification than knitting, but that may just be the bulky yarn and big hook talking 🙂

      I remember watching both of my grandmothers knit and/or crochet at one time or another, and I even learned enough of one of those crafts (crochet, I think?) to make myself a very wonky tie-on belt. But none of what I learned stuck. And I’m hopeless with books. It took knittinghelp.com to really make it sink in. And I’m getting the crochet thing via videos, too. So, yay, internet!!

  7. Polka Dot Cottage: Learning to crochet http://bit.ly/mRtfzy

  8. Polka Dot Cottage: Learning to crochet http://bit.ly/pqQL1I

  9. […] it for evenings and weekends, after the day’s work was done. It’s been four years and two years respectively since I learned each craft, and in that time I have published some patterns, but I […]

  10. […] I’ve been racking my brain, and I just can’t remember! I know it was some time after I started crocheting, and some time before I took her Craftsy Class. Suffice it to say it’s been a few years, and […]

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