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Everyday Cardigan KAL: Yoke part 2

Good morning! Let’s finish that yoke today.

If you are planning to make your sweater with short sleeves, you’ll want to pay special attention, because the last 1/2-inch of the yoke will be different for you!

Stockinette Rows 21-24

Everyday Cardigan KAL: Yoke part 2

These rows are worked exactly like the previous section of Stockinette Rows, except that there are no buttonholes to work.

Everyday Cardigan KAL: Yoke part 2

Work rows 21-24 as written in the pattern PDF.

Ribbing Rows 25-32

Everyday Cardigan KAL: Yoke part 2

These rows are worked exactly like the previous section of Ribbing Rows, except that there is a buttonhole to work on Row 29. Don’t forget it! Also, this ribbing is not meant to line up directly with the previous ribbing, so don’t worry that it doesn’t.

Everyday Cardigan KAL: Yoke part 2

Work rows 25-32 as written in the pattern PDF.

Stockinette Rows 33 to end of yoke

Everyday Cardigan KAL: Yoke part 2
These rows are worked exactly like the previous sections of Stockinette Rows with a few exceptions:

  1. The two increase rows are worked on the right side of the fabric and so you will be knitting into the front and back of the stitches instead of purling.
  2. Row 53 is a buttonhole row. Depending on the size you are knitting (and to some extent your row gauge), 53 may or may not be part of your yoke. Whether 53 is a yoke row or a body row for you, don’t forget to add a buttonhole.

Everyday Cardigan KAL: Yoke part 2
If you are doing long sleeves, work Rows 33 to end of yoke as written in the pattern PDF

Video: Knit Front and Back Loop (KFB) by Sapphires and Purls

That’s it for you this week. Only read the next section if you are making short sleeves.

Cap Sleeve Variation

Find the spot in your pattern PDF where it tells you how many inches long the yoke is supposed to be for your size. Now, subtract 1/2-inch from that number.

For example, if you’re knitting a size 40, you are instructed to work the Stockinette Rows until the yoke measures 8.5 inches. To make cap sleeves, you will only knit until the yoke measures 8 inches. And then you will work the following rows:

Everyday Cardigan KAL: Yoke part 2

Cap Sleeve Row 1

[k1,p1] twice.

Knit across 32 (38, 37, 43, 45, 48, 51) sts.

pm.

[k1,p1] 22(22,22,22,25,26,26) times.

Knit across 68 (76, 78, 90, 98, 100, 106) sts.

pm.

[k1,p1] 22(22,22,22,25,26,26) times.

Knit across 32 (38, 37, 43, 45, 48, 51) sts.

For the next three Cap Sleeve Rows, you’ll be working the following pattern: seed stitch button band, stockinette stitch front panel, seed stitch sleeve, stockinette stitch back panel, seed stitch sleeve, stockinette stitch front panel, seed stitch button band. Like so:

Cap Sleeve Rows 2 and 4: [p1,k1] twice, purl across to next marker, [p1,k1] across to next marker, purl across to next marker, [p1,k1] across to next marker, purl across to next marker, [p1,k1] twice.

Cap Sleeve Row 3: [k1,p1] twice, knit across to next marker, [k1,p1] across to next marker, knit across to next marker, [k1,p1] across to next marker, knit across to next marker, [k1,p1] twice.

Now, you will notice, your yoke should be the same length as the original pattern wanted it to be. The four Cap Sleeve Rows added the missing 1/2-inch.

Next week

At this point, no matter which sleeve variation you are doing, you should have a completed yoke. Yay! Next week, we’ll separate the stitches on your needle into body stitches and sleeve stitches, and we’ll cast on some underarm stitches.

Those of you doing the long sleeves will transfer your sleeve stitches to waste yarn, and those of you doing the short sleeves will bind those stitches off entirely.

Either way, it’s going to be fun. This is really my favorite part of knitting a sweater, because suddenly there are a lot fewer stitches on your needles, and the rows begin to go a lot faster.

Any questions about this week’s lesson, please leave a comment!

 

 

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