Posted on 17 Comments

Let’s talk about e-readers and crafty people

Do you have a Kindle? a Nook? Plan to get one at some point in the future?  I don’t have one myself (that’s Neil‘s in the photo) and I’m curious about how you (as in YOU, you creatively-inclined people) use them.

Do you ever download crafty reading? Knitting, sewing, or polymer clay books, for instance?  Do you download magazines onto your readers?  How does the Kindle or Nook do with such image-rich material?  Do you find it difficult to read tutorials or patterns on it?  What are some things that you wish publishers had done differently in order to make their e-book tutorials easier to read?

I’m eager to start converting my pdf patterns to the various e-reader formats (the more downloadable options the merrier, right?), and I want the material to flow in the nicest possible manner.  So speak to me, crafty e-book-reading people!  What would make you happy?

P.S. I doctored the image above. The Spring Wrap Skirt pattern isn’t yet available for Kindle 🙂

Posted on 17 Comments

17 thoughts on “Let’s talk about e-readers and crafty people

  1. I only use my iPad for patterns, not the Kindle. I don’t like that it’s only B&W. The iPad, however, is perfect for loading pdf patterns for travel. Love it.

    1. I’m with you on the B&W thing – it’s one of the big reasons I haven’t felt the pull to get a Kindle myself.

      On the iPad, do you just use straight .pdf formats, or do you use a Kindle app?

  2. I’ve thought about using the Kindle for crochet patterns, but I haven’t, yet. (I do have a couple of PDFs of crochet patterns already loaded onto it, though.) I like the idea of not having to print out a pattern, and yet not being tied to the computer or laptop. I think I’m less inclined to use the Kindle for craft reading where color and/or pretty pictures are a big part of the experience– but it’s possible that if I had a tutorial in multiple formats, I’d admire the photos on the computer, then use the (more portable) Kindle when I got down to using the written instructions.

    1. Assuming color was a non-issue (I know, *big* assumption) what would be the best way to view the images related to the patterns? One large image on a page followed by a page of instructions? A smaller thumbnail next to the instructions? A larger image after the instructions?

      1. Hm… I don’t have a lot of experience looking at images on the Kindle, but I’d think that large images would be better– if not a full-page photo, at least not a tiny one. I find it quick and easy to flip a page back and forth, but seeing details in a small thumbnail might be difficult.

        1. That’s kind of what I thought as well. I did some testing this weekend, though, and it does appear that you can enlarge images to see more detail when necessary.

  3. I bought myself a Nook Color with Wifi for Christmas. I was so ready to do all my crafty reading, and other reading, in this handy form. After 3 days and no access to the magazines I liked and the images being less than stellar, I returned it. I don’t think this technology is for me. For an above middle aged person, I am tech saavy, but find that the tech devices I use are those that suit my needs directly.

    My 2 cents…

    1. Well, that must have been a disappointing discovery! I downloaded a few sample Kindle books for the Kindle app on my Android tablet, and they’re actually quite nice! I was surprised, to be honest. This may be a format I can live with after all.

      Still, it’s hard not to love a stack of actual books on the coffee table…

  4. I have the newer nook mini that is black and white. I am only using it for reading “trash”. I am still going to buy crafty books and most non fiction in actual book form. I wasn’t a huge fan of getting one but spouselet thought I would love it…so he bought it for me…

    Funny thing, I have never fallen asleep with a book in my hand but do with the Nook all the time.

    1. I fall asleep no matter what format I’m reading 🙂

      Ok, so I can understand not wanting an entire craft book in B&W format, but what about a tutorial? Something that would normally come as a 5 or 6 page pdf and not be printed and bound, for instance. Is that something you could see reading on a Kindle?

      1. Not for me, but I don’t do a ton with tutorials anyway. I am much better hands on visual/video/live demo person myself.

        Not that there isn’t a market for that sort of thing, I am just not the target. 😉

  5. Love my kindle for reading crafty stuff as well as novels. It’s true the kindle doesn’t do photos great but the best part is Kindle for PC. You can sync your books to your computer and view in colour. The kindle is portable and you can take it right to your craft table for quick reference.

    1. Yes! Precisely the point I forgot to make 🙂 If you need full color, there is always the desktop for that.

  6. I have a Nook Color and a Kindle but read things on the Nook almost exclusively. I read about a book a week (so wish I could read faster!!!) and for the last several months they’ve all been on the Nook (either on my Droid phone or the Nook itself) or the Kindle (before I got the Nook). What I love about the Nook is that I can borrow books from the public library so they’re free. Kindle will get that capability later this year but I couldn’t wait.
    So far, I’ve not done any craft books or projects on the Nook and why? Because it didn’t occur to me to try that! DUH… I will definitely check that out later today. Thanks for prodding my ancient brain!

    1. Oh, you’re not alone on that! It’s surprising to me how many people use book-related technologies (ebooks, goodreads, etc.) only with novels and never think to include all of their other favorite kinds of reading (craft books, cookbooks, etc.). I haven’t had that problem mainly because there were a good many years there that I didn’t make the time for books with words. When my kids were little, it was all crafty-books-with-pictures all the time 🙂

  7. Good evening!! I use mine for reading blogs and books only. I use my laptop for all else.

    1. Thanks for the feedback!

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